CRAFTING YOUR MESSAGES

CRAFTING YOUR MESSAGES

Artisans and makers compete with a glut of messaging and advertising. Craft shows are filled with posters and panels. Online messaging and social media are littered with tepid promises such as ‘handmade’ and ‘unique’ or ‘all natural.’  Even classic brick and mortar retailing requires artisan to come up with high quality text and written materials.

Consumers are tired of lacklustre messaging.  Data  presented by Business Wire show that:

·       91%  of consumers have unsubscribed from permission-based marketing emails

·       77% report being more cautious about providing their email address to companies

·       81%   have either “unliked” or removed a company’s posts from their Facebook news feed.

 

They are clear about the reasons for their disapproval. The brand-building experts at Sprout  found out that:

·       46%  of consumers unfollow a brand  because of “too many promotional messages”

·       41%  believe that the information they receive is “not relevant”

·       Only 18% of consumers said the brand was “too quiet”

On the other hand, a staggering 74% of consumers follow a brand because they are interested in their product (or service).

Despite the ever-growing “noise” in the market, artisans and makers can build messages that appeal to their target segments and compel these shoppers to action.

To do so is not difficult, nor is it expensive.

The first step to avoid the consumer’s proverbial yawn is to clearly identify what and who is your target market. The better you know the people you are speaking to, the easier it is to find the right words to gain and maintain their attention.

After that you should determine what you want to accomplish. In general, artisans aim for one of the below:

·      Awareness of their business

·      Reminders (show attendance, special promotion, pop-up, etc.)

·      Changing or re-enforcing their brand-image

·      Generating direct sales

Experts suggest that one set of words or content be dedicated to one goal. This makes it easier to write the right phrases and avoids confusing the shopper about what they should remember or do.

Then you have to conquer your fear. Much of today’s messaging is faint-hearted and sterile. To stand out from the crowd you need to come up with compelling words that capture the interest of your potential customers. Here is an example from marketing a music player/mp3 player.

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Next, you must consider the consumer, not your business. The consumer is only mildly interested in you. She might, however, be very curious of what your product can do for her. Therefore, this one does not work:  

“We have been recognized as a leader in hand-crafted furniture for over 20 years. Many high profile customers benefitted from our services. We are constantly innovating our products and use only the highest quality woods from across North America.” 

Here is a better approach:  

“The chairs that we built can be modified exactly how you like it. No more endless adjusting of your chair. Instead, it adapts to you.  And that means our chairs will help you eliminate back and neck pain.”

Another example of putting the customer first, comes from the messaging of an artisan who makes a mineral based, totally organic deodorant:

“Control your sweat with DeoRocks. Sweat less. Live more. Wear whatever you want whenever you want.”

Most if not all of what your shoppers want is related to very basic emotions:

·      Fear (of loss)

·      Pride

·      Love

·      Anger

·      Guilt

·      Frustration

·      Greed

·      Hope

 

When you write content or advertising your words should appeal to these emotions or alleviate them.

"People rarely buy features. People sometimes buy benefits. People always buy emotion."

Glenn Fisher (Author, Speaker, Copywriter)

 

CRAFTING THE RIGHT MESSAGES Pt. 2: TEN EXPERT TIPS

CRAFTING THE RIGHT MESSAGES Pt. 2: TEN EXPERT TIPS

DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR WEBSITE REALLY NEEDS?

DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR WEBSITE REALLY NEEDS?